College of Agriculture and Natural Resources
Center for Land Use Education and Research

Riparian Corridors Webinar

CLEAR Webinar Library | 2013 Series | 2012 Series | 2011 Series

Read Abstract

Riparian, or streamside, corridors provide a host of environmental benefits, from erosion control and wildlife habitat to water quality protection. What is the state of riparian corridors in Connecticut, and what options are there for addressing riparian corridor protection?

This webinar will focus on a recently completed CLEAR study showing changes to 100 foot and 300 foot riparian corridor areas during the 21-year period from 1985 to 2006. We will review statewide, watershed, and town-level data, and demonstrate the use of the project website. We will also present information on the functions and values of riparian corridors of various widths, the relationship between wetlands and riparian corridors, and the need for local commissions, land trusts and other conservation groups to work together on the conservation of these critical areas.

Running Time: 00:52:23

Instructors:

Emily Wilson, Geospatial Educator
emily.wilson@uconn.edu

Emily's Bio

Emily Wilson is the Geospatial Technology Specialist for the NEMO program. Since joining UConn in 2000, her role has been to provide GIS remote sensing information and support to the NEMO project, the Geospatial Training program and other related research and outreach efforts. She also does a significant amount of web work with the goal of providing easy access to geospatial information and maps.

Emily is a graduate of Connecticut College with a BA in environmental science and botany. She received her M.S. in forestry and remote sensing from the University of Maine.

Juliana Barrett, Assistant Educator
juliana.barrett@uconn.edu

Juliana's Bio

Juliana Barrett became a member of the NEMO team in 2006. She is an Assistant Educator in Residence with Connecticut Sea Grant and the NEMO program. As an ecologist, her focus is the coastal habitats of Connecticut. She works with the towns and groups working on the conservation, restoration and enhancement of coastal areas. Juliana is developing programs to assist coastal community leaders with technical matters related to the impact of land use on coastal habitats, riparian buffers, habitat management and restoration of coastal habitats.

Juliana is the co-author of The Vegetation of Connecticut, a Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection publication. Previously, Juliana was the Geoffrey C. Hughes Tidelands Program Director with the Nature Conservancy in Connecticut, and also did private consulting. Juliana has a Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, a M.A. from the Department of Earth and Planetary Science at Johns Hopkins University, and a bachelor’s degree from Smith College in Biology.